How to Assemble a Great Cheese Platter

Cheese, Salami, and Nuts

 Pick 3-4 Cheeses to serve. A general rule is 4 ounces a person but it depends on the time of day and what else you are serving with it.

Vary the consistency of the cheese: a soft fresh cheese, a semi hard and a harder cheese like Parmesan.
Provide three different milk types: a goat, a sheep and a cow’s milk for variety.

Serve at room temperature. Leave the wedges whole with a knife to cut, or cut a few slices to get it started. Decorate the platter with grapes, cucumbers, apple slices…
A nice jam to serve with it would be fun, like Laura Ann’s Blackberry Bayleaf or Raspberry Habanero! Serve with fresh bread. You can also add some simple crackers or a nice crostini.
Open a bottle of wine!!

Suggestions: A Fresh Goat Cheese or Crottin, Point Reyes Toma, Aged Gouda, Ossau Iraty Sheep Cheese
California Cheese: Cowgirl Creamery Mt Tam, Central Coast Creamery Goat Gouda, Fiscalini Bandaged Cheddar, Cypress Grove Lambchopper
American: Nettle Meadow Kunik from N.Y. (a creamy blend of Goat and Jersey Cow milk), Beehive Cheese Barely Buzzed, Utah (rubbed in coffee), Beecher’s Flagsheep, WA (voted best cheese by the American Cheese Society).

We have a great selection of cheeses in our store. Need a basket with fresh cheese? Try our Cheese 101 Gift Basket or check our Gourmet Gifts page for other delicious gifts.
Need help? Come to our store or call us at 855 313 5680.

Advertisements

Terroir

Terry August in Burgundy at the Romanée-Conti Vineyard

Recently, at the Fancy Food Show in San Francisco, I was being instructed by a man, bordering on zealot, as to how to try his chocolate. He had what is known as Single Origin chocolate bars, bars made with cacao beans from a specific region of the world. In this case he was talking emphatically of specific plantations. “No, try this one next,” he said, gesturing to the end of the row. “But first rub it and smell, then put it in your mouth, inhale and notice the strong scent of blueberries.” Okay, okay… But, oh wow! A strong taste of blueberries and chocolate indeed. The next bar, from Ecuador, was all about green bananas. The Venezuelan was dark and earthy. Why such a startling difference in taste?

The French word terroir (tair-wah, literally soil), often used in discussing wine, explains a lot of the variation. The idea of terroir is that a specific place, the soil, water, flora and fauna and other factors, makes itself known in the foods that are grown there.
A chardonnay grape grown in France will be different than one grown in Napa. Cows eating grass in England will produce a different milk than cows in Vermont. Which brings us back to chocolate. Oh, doesn’t everything!

Come to a chocolate tasting at our shop on Melrose and taste the difference in fine single origin chocolate or just pick up a few choice bars and have your own private tasting. It might be the most delicious research ever.